Tag Archives: healthy eating

Pork and chinese cabbage dumplings


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J’s favourite dumplings are pork and chinese cabbage filled.

They require an extra step than their Pork and Chives cousin (check out that post and see how sweet J looks when she was a little younger).

Here, the Wong Bok (Chinese Cabbage) needs to be sliced, blanched in hot water and drained. Once cooled, I squeeze any water out of them. Don’t under estimate the amount of cabbage here, a whole cabbage goes into making 120 dumplings.

They are the perfect partner to beautiful pork mince, as their flavour is more neutral than chives. You also wouldn’t feel the need to brush your teeth and gargle with mouthwash 3 times after eating them.

J and I enjoy this time together, wrapping the little parcels . Below are photos with her showing you how the pleating is done. (scroll to the bottom for the recipe itself).

They are perfect for freezing (on a tray, dusted with a bit of flour); boiling, steaming and pan frying. I have included two cooking methods in the recipe below. Now, time to roll up your sleeves and get ready to wrap!

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Pork and Chinese Cabbage filling

  • 1kg lean pork mince
  • 1 large Chinese Cabbage (Wong Bok)
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tbsp chicken stock powder
  • 2 tbsp sugar
  • 4 tbsp shao xhing wine (or sherry)
  • 1 tbsp fish sauce
  • 2 tbsp dark soy sauce
  • 3 tbsp corn flour
  • 1 tbsp sesame oil

Wraps

  • 2 packet of dumpling wrappers (120 pcs), these can be round or square shape. (Another post coming soon with a recipe for the wrappers.)
  • Small bowl of water, for sealing
  • Extra flour, for dusting

Directions

  1. Mix all of the filling ingredients together and let it marinate for 20 minutes.
  2. In the mean time, take the dumpling wrappers out of the fridge and let it return to room temperature before starting to make the dumpling. They are more pliable i.e. if you are greedy you can fit more into each dumpling.
  3. Take a little spoonful of filling and place it in the middle of the wrapper.
  4. Dip your finger into the bowl of water and wet the edge of the wrapper.
  5. Fold the wrapper over the filling, forming a moon shape.
  6. Hold the dumpling in your left hand, like holding a taco.
  7. With your right index and middle fingers, flex the dough towards the left to form one pleat.
  8. Press the dough down together against your left thumb, which is just supporting the other side of the dumpling.
  9. Repeat 5 times. (There’s a short video on my Insta stories, under Recipes – Salty.)
  10. For boiled dumplings: Fill half of a large pot or saucepan with water and bring it to a boil. (note not to fill over two- thirds of the pot as you will be adding more water later on.) Add 1 tsp salt to the water and add the dumplings in, be careful not to over crowd the pot.
  11. When the water returns to a boil, pour in half a cup of cold water and wait for it to return to a boil. At this point, you add a second half cup of cold water. This is repeated until you have added water three times in total and the water has returned to a full boil. The dumplings are ready!
  12. For pan fried dumplings: heat a large pan with 2 tsp of oil. When the pan is hot, place dumplings in, flat bottoms down, in a circular pattern. Cook on medium high for 1-2 minutes till the bottom is nicely crisp. Pour in hot water that goes to to a third of the height of the dumplings. Note: it will bubble like mad! Cover with lid and let it cook for 2-3 minutes in medium heat. Keep an eye on it to make sure the water hasn’t evaporated too quickly. Once the water has evaporated, a lattice skin will form on the bottom of the pan. Take it off the heat, and carefully place a plate over the dumplings. Flip the pan while holding the plate with the other hand so that the cooked dumplings are transferred over to the plate entirely, without breaking the lattice skin. (Imagine flipping an upside down cake on a plate.)
  13. Serve with chilli oil, a tiny bit of soy sauce, sesame oil and Chinese vinegar.

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The Wong Bok was kindly gifted by The Fresh Grower. Thank you!

Chinese Poached Chicken


This is a dish where most of the cooking is done without spending too much time in front of the stove. You can work on your other dishes while this is cooking. Yes you have a bit of chopping and tearing to do in the end, but to me it is time well spent for a healthy, delicious and succulent dish. Chicken cooked like this remains very moist and tender. J loves this.

Ingredients:
1 size 14 whole chicken
2 litres chicken stock
2 teaspoon salt
8 whole black peppercorns
1 stalk of green onions, chopped into finger long lengths
5 slices of ginger
Enough water to cover the chicken

Dipping Sauce:
5 Tbsp oil
2 stalks of green onions, chopped into small thin rounds
4 slices of ginger, chopped into small pieces
3 tsp salt

Garnish (optional):
Cucumber ribbons
Coriander
Spring onions
Garlic chilli sauce
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Preparation time: 20 minutes
Cooking and cooling time: 1 hour and 10 minutes

Instructions:

1. Place the chicken, chicken stock, salt, peppercorns, green onions, ginger in a large stockpot and set it over high heat. Add enough water to cover the chicken.
2. Bring this to a boil, reduce heat to a low simmer, and cook for about 1 hour until the chicken is still very tender. Skim the surface of any foam. (If you own a Thermos cooker, then you would bring this to a boil for 5 minutes, take it off the heat and place it in the outer shell of the Thermos cooker for an hour).
3. Remove the chicken and place in a large bowl. Chill it with cold water. Replace water a few times until the chicken has cooled down.
4. Once the chicken is cool to the touch, set it in a large bowl.
5. If you don’t like eating chicken skin, gently remove it and discard.
6. Remove the wings and drums off. Reserve for plating.
7. Tease the two breasts off the bones – they should come off quite easily if the chicken is cooked. (If there are any signs of an undercooked chicken, you can put the whole chicken in the microwave for a short 30 seconds to finish the cooking process.) Set aside.
8. Continue to remove all the meat off the bones. Discard all bones.
9. Slice the chicken meat into thin pieces. Plate up with wings and drums on the side.
10. Make your dipping sauce by heating the oil in a small pan. Add the chopped green onions, ginger and salt. Fry until it is fragrant, about 1 minute.
11. Pour this into a dipping sauce dish, and serve with chicken.
12. Best served with hot rice and optional garnish of cucumber ribbons, coriander, extra spring onions and hot chilli sauce.

Dumplings with Pork and chinese chives


I haven’t always made macarons. Believe it or not, I cook more savory dishes than sweet! When I feel stressed and in need to do something to relax, I make dumplings*. It’s quite therapeutic really, mixing ingredients and wrapping the little parcels of joy. I think it is the repetitive nature of the process, that calms me down and allows my thinking brain a rest.

Today J will demo for you how these are made.

Pork and Chinese chives filling
400g lean pork mince
100g fatty pork mince
1 large bunch of Chinese chives
1 egg
2 tsp chicken stock powder
1 tbsp sugar
2 tbsp shao xhing wine ( or sherry)
2 tbsp light soy sauce
1 tbsp dark soy sauce
2 tbsp corn flour
1 tbsp sesame oil

wraps
1 packet of dumpling wrappers (60 pcs), these can be round or square shape.
Small bowl of water, for sealing
Extra flour, for dusting

Mix all of the filling ingredients together and let it marinate for 20 minutes.
In the mean time, take the dumpling wrappers out of the fridge and let it return to room temperature before starting to make the dumpling. They are more pliable i.e. if you are greedy you can fit more into each dumpling.

Take a little spoonful of filling and place it in the middle of the wrapper.

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Dip your finger into the bowl of water and wet the edge of the wrapper.

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Fold the wrapper over the filling, forming a moon shape.
Pinch the edges of the dumpling to seal it off (there are many ways of pinching the dumplings, however this is the easiest way, at least for J.)

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Fill half of a large pot or saucepan with water and bring it to a boil. (note not to fill over two- thirds of the pot as you will be adding more water later on.) Add 1 tsp salt to the water and add the dumplings in, be careful not to over crowd the pot.

When the water returns to a boil, pour in half a cup of cold water and wait for it to return to a boil. At this point, you add a second half cup of cold water. This is repeated until you have added water three times in total and the water has returned to a full boil. The dumplings are ready!

Serve with chilli paste, soy sauce and/ or Chinese red vinegar.

* It is very possible that next time I feel like doing something repetitive, I will be making macarons!